Video purports to show Islamic State beheading another U.S. journalist →

(via latimes)

Published on 2 Sep 2014 Reblogged from latimes

This is the sad state of America we are in today. Where a black man waiting for his children is considered such a threat that police are dispatched.

Jon Stewart Has A Message For ISIS →

Every attorney I know who handles these claims has seen the same thing I have: Insurance companies deny more claims made by minorities, the poor, and those who live in bad neighborhoods. Why? Michigan (like many states) has no “bad faith” law. If you sue the insurance company and win, they pay you the same amount of money, at best, that they would have paid you originally. They have nothing to lose by denying the claim. And if a person doesn’t sue, then they come out ahead. In other words, it is in their best interest to deny claims if the odds are that some of those denied won’t sue.

— Steve Lehto explains why minorities get the shaft from insurance companies when they get their cars stolen.

vicemag:

Leading Anti-Marijuana Academics Are Paid by Painkiller Drug Companies
As Americans continue to embrace pot—as medicine and for recreational use—opponents are turning to a set of academic researchers to claim that policymakers should avoid relaxing restrictions around marijuana. It’s too dangerous, risky, and untested, they say. Just as drug company-funded research has become incredibly controversial in recent years, forcing major medical schools and journals to institute strict disclosure requirements, could there be a conflict of interest issue in the pot debate?
VICE has found that many of the researchers who have advocated against legalizing pot have also been on the payroll of leading pharmaceutical firms with products that could be easily replaced by using marijuana. When these individuals have been quoted in the media, their drug-industry ties have not been revealed.
Take, for example, Dr. Herbert Kleber of Columbia University. Kleber has impeccable academic credentials, and has been quoted in the press and in academic publications warning against the use of marijuana, which he stresses may cause wide-ranging addiction and public health issues. But when he’s writing anti-pot opinion pieces for CBS News, or being quoted by NPR and CNBC, what’s left unsaid is that Kleber has served as a paid consultant to leading prescription drug companies, including Purdue Pharma (the maker of OxyContin), Reckitt Benckiser (the producer of a painkiller called Nurofen), and Alkermes (the producer of a powerful new opioid called Zohydro).
Continue

vicemag:

Leading Anti-Marijuana Academics Are Paid by Painkiller Drug Companies

As Americans continue to embrace pot—as medicine and for recreational use—opponents are turning to a set of academic researchers to claim that policymakers should avoid relaxing restrictions around marijuana. It’s too dangerous, risky, and untested, they say. Just as drug company-funded research has become incredibly controversial in recent years, forcing major medical schools and journals to institute strict disclosure requirements, could there be a conflict of interest issue in the pot debate?

VICE has found that many of the researchers who have advocated against legalizing pot have also been on the payroll of leading pharmaceutical firms with products that could be easily replaced by using marijuana. When these individuals have been quoted in the media, their drug-industry ties have not been revealed.

Take, for example, Dr. Herbert Kleber of Columbia University. Kleber has impeccable academic credentials, and has been quoted in the press and in academic publications warning against the use of marijuana, which he stresses may cause wide-ranging addiction and public health issues. But when he’s writing anti-pot opinion pieces for CBS News, or being quoted by NPR and CNBC, what’s left unsaid is that Kleber has served as a paid consultant to leading prescription drug companies, including Purdue Pharma (the maker of OxyContin), Reckitt Benckiser (the producer of a painkiller called Nurofen), and Alkermes (the producer of a powerful new opioid called Zohydro).

Continue

guardian:

The rate of police killings of black Americans is nearly the same as the rate of lynchings in the early decades of the 20th century.
Photos: JB Forbes / St Louis Post-Dispatch via AP; Wikimedia Commons

guardian:

The rate of police killings of black Americans is nearly the same as the rate of lynchings in the early decades of the 20th century.

Photos: JB Forbes / St Louis Post-Dispatch via AP; Wikimedia Commons

Published on 25 Aug 2014 Reblogged from guardian

Bank of America admits: You got us... →

Finally BoA fesses up to their dark practices and major role in the 2008 financial crisis.

Missouri Lt. Governor is out of touch with Americans →

Let’s put aside the diatribe rant on anglo-American justice and concentrate on “we do not do justice in America on the streets.” For one, of course justice is served on the streets. The right to protest is the 1st amendment in the Constitution! Secondly do you think Michael Brown was served justice in the streets when he was shot down? Was that the justice Peter Kinder was alluding to? Where cops get their day in court and black teens are served their sentences at the end of barrel in their own country.

Cenk Uygur talks with Russell Brand on how to bring down the system.

The crime rate has dropped since legalizing marijuana in CO →

Does this mean if we legalize federally the national crime rate will lower?